Hurricanes are rotating tropical storms that form over warm waters. These powerful storms can affect Canada environmentally, socially, and economically. There are  5 categories of hurricanes that can be measured on the Saffir- Simpson hurricane scale based on the wind speed of the hurricane which can also define what category the hurricane is. A category 1 hurricane has drastic differences than a category 5 hurricane. For instance, category 1 hurricanes have wind speeds that are between 74 mph to 95 mph, where as a category 5 hurricane has sustained wind speeds that are greater than 155 ( Longe, 431- 433). Hurricanes can create minimal damage but can also cause some major destructive damage as well. Climate change contributes to hurricanes in a big way for many reasons. If there are warmer sea surface temperatures, it can increase tropical wind speeds. Also, if you have warmer seas it can create more precipitation. If these sea levels rise, there is a  possibility of more possible coastal storms like hurricanes in the future (Hurricanes and). During certain months, there are different averages of tropical storms that occur in a year. For instance, between June and November, there is an average of six tropical storms per year that develop into hurricanes along places such as the east coast of North America, frequently over the Gulf of Mexico or over the Caribbean Sea ( movement and). Tropical storms have intense wind speeds that cause some big destructive damage to the environment and to ecosystems as well. Hurricanes and the strong winds they produce can cause some huge destructive damage issues, which can lead into bigger problems for the environment. These strong winds can destroy forest canopies,  and some wooden ecosystems (How do). Rivers are also impacted by all of the rainfall hurricanes cause creating them to be swamped and the water levels can rise as well. Some areas in central Canada could be affected by hurricanes that were caused from torrential rains, and breezy winds after a hurricane in the United States is moving. For example, in 2011, Hurricane Irene had a forceful impact on Quebec City. Irene brought rain over places in Canada such as Kingston Ont, Halifax NS, Newfoundland and Labrador, and also rained in New Jersey. This storm had wind speeds that surpassed 113 km/h hitting east of Quebec City. Hurricane Irene caused basements to flood, triggered landslides, and roads were also collapsing from this awful hurricane (Dangerfield). Hurricanes can not only wipe out the environment and ecosystems but they can impact people socially as well. This tropical storm can impact people by losingtheir homes or jobs, affecting them socially. Hurricanes can have such powerful winds that they can destroy or flood a person’s house with all of the rainfall. It can also contaminate the drinking water causing people to get very ill drinking this water once it was contaminated, because they don’t have any clean water left and they can get very ill from dehydration as well. Another way people can get ill is by all of the debris that has been accumulated, lack of food and having no sanitation. In 2007, Nova Scotia was hit by a category 1 hurricane named Noel. Hurricane Noel left more than 170,000 homes and businesses without  power throughout Nova Scotia. This hurricane affected Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, and Newfoundland as well (Katie,Dangerfield). 400,000 homes in the Fredericton area had no power leaving people in the dark (Environment and climate change). Hurricanes can leave people very ill with no house to live in and with no power. A hurricane like Noel left building’s and people’s personal properties to be damaged. Due to this damage, there will be some major expenses that can create problems economically. Hurricane Igor hit Newfoundland as a category 1 hurricane on September 21, 2010. This hurricane cost around $200 million dollars in damage. Igor also caused $65 million dollars in insured damage. Most of these declares were for the damage to homes, businesses and cars that were all confirmed by PCS-Canada (Hurricane Igor). Another hurricane was named Hurricane Hazel. Hurricane Hazel struck southern Ontario on October 15, 1954. There was a total costs of $100 million dollars in destruction damage (Hurricane Hazel). For instance, in Holland Marsh, there was 7 thousand acres of land that was turned into a lake by the flood. In addition, there were 500 homes that were destroyed by hurricane Hazel and there were early estimates that the cost of this damage was up to $10 million dollars. Hazel also damaged a newly constructed hospital in Dufferin by a flood, that cost $10,000 dollars  (Effects of Hazel). All these hurricanes have caused damage that can cost millions of dollars in repairs from what was destroyed from these storms.Hurricanes are tropical storms that can cause some major destructive damage. Canada could be affected by hurricanes when hurricanes are moving towards other places like Canada or afterward a hurricane, such as getting lots of rain. Canada could also be affected if places in the country get hit by a hurricane. For instance, Hurricane Hazel, Igor, Irene, and Noel are some of the hurricanes that hit places like Nova Scotia in Canada. With the damage a hurricane accumulated, it can create people to come into a different country like Canada. These disastrous storms can lead to big repairs that can be very expensive. With hurricanes being very damaging, it can affect an environment and completely ruin our ecosystem. These storms can also turn someone’s life upside down. Homes, buildings and businesses being shut down and damaged leaves people without a home, and without a job, impacting them socially. Hurricanes and the damage that was produced by the storm caused some repair work that had to be done made repair fees to be very expensive. Hurricanes affect not only communities that were hit by the storm but countries like Canada as well. 

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